Heroin Addiction Recovery Statistics | Northern Illinois Recovery

Heroin Addiction Recovery Statistics

During a heroin addiction, your body can become dependent on your substance of choice in order to feel normal, which can make it difficult to quit using. The earlier addiction is treated, the better your recovery outcomes are. The heroin addiction recovery statistics depends on several factors, including whether or not you complete a heroin addiction treatment program.

More than 20 million American adults struggle with an addiction or substance abuse disorder annually. Opiates have become among the most commonly abused substances in the country, especially among young adults. In fact, heroin use increased by more than 200% among 18-25-year-olds over the past 10 years. Opiates, including both prescription and illicit ones, are highly addictive and prone to abuse.

What is Heroin?

Heroin is an illegal opiate that commonly comes in a powder or solid form. Heroin is typically inhaled, smoked, or injected. Intravenous use is dangerous and increases your chances of suffering an overdose. Heroin, like other opiates, is a powerful central nervous system depressant that forces your brain to release a powerful rush of dopamine. This rush creates the pleasurable effects associated with intoxication and also causes your brain’s pleasure and reward center to change.

When intoxication ends, you are left with a sudden lack of dopamine. Over time, your brain can become dependent on heroin in order to release dopamine. Your brain associates people, places, and things that remind you of heroin with pleasure, which causes cravings when you are exposed to triggers. Heroin can also cause physical dependency and overwhelming withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal symptoms can begin within hours of your last use and can cause:

  • Aches and pains
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Restless legs
  • Cramps and dehydration
  • Anxiety and insomnia

What is the Heroin Addiction Recovery Statistics?

Since heroin addiction will continue to progress and get worse until you receive treatment, early treatment is an essential component of the heroin addiction recovery statistics. During addiction, your brain and body become dependent on heroin in order to function properly. It can take time for your brain to relearn how to properly release neurotransmitters, which can make cravings more intense.

Completing treatment is another central part of the heroin addiction recovery statistics because participating in a program improves your chances of maintaining sobriety. Treatment helps teach you how to identify and cope with triggers and cravings. Evidence-based treatment and holistic treatment options can also improve your ability to change negative thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.

Treatment programs vary in length, as most inpatient programs last for 28 days while outpatient programs may last for several months.

Heroin Addiction Treatment Options

If you are wondering what the heroin addiction recovery statistics are, chances are you or a loved one is struggling with heroin addiction. You do not need to battle addiction alone. Northern Illinois Recover is here to help you through every step of the way. It is never too early, or too late, to reach out for help. Contact us today at 855.786.1978 to discuss your treatment options and to learn more about our programs.

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Heroin Addiction Recovery Statistics

During a heroin addiction, your body can become dependent on your substance of choice in order to feel normal, which can make it difficult to quit using. The earlier addiction is treated, the better your recovery outcomes are. The heroin addiction recovery statistics depends on several factors, including whether or not you complete a heroin addiction treatment program.

More than 20 million American adults struggle with an addiction or substance abuse disorder annually. Opiates have become among the most commonly abused substances in the country, especially among young adults. In fact, heroin use increased by more than 200% among 18-25-year-olds over the past 10 years. Opiates, including both prescription and illicit ones, are highly addictive and prone to abuse.

What is Heroin?

Heroin is an illegal opiate that commonly comes in a powder or solid form. Heroin is typically inhaled, smoked, or injected. Intravenous use is dangerous and increases your chances of suffering an overdose. Heroin, like other opiates, is a powerful central nervous system depressant that forces your brain to release a powerful rush of dopamine. This rush creates the pleasurable effects associated with intoxication and also causes your brain’s pleasure and reward center to change.

When intoxication ends, you are left with a sudden lack of dopamine. Over time, your brain can become dependent on heroin in order to release dopamine. Your brain associates people, places, and things that remind you of heroin with pleasure, which causes cravings when you are exposed to triggers. Heroin can also cause physical dependency and overwhelming withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal symptoms can begin within hours of your last use and can cause:

  • Aches and pains
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Restless legs
  • Cramps and dehydration
  • Anxiety and insomnia

What is the Heroin Addiction Recovery Statistics?

Since heroin addiction will continue to progress and get worse until you receive treatment, early treatment is an essential component of the heroin addiction recovery statistics. During addiction, your brain and body become dependent on heroin in order to function properly. It can take time for your brain to relearn how to properly release neurotransmitters, which can make cravings more intense.

Completing treatment is another central part of the heroin addiction recovery statistics because participating in a program improves your chances of maintaining sobriety. Treatment helps teach you how to identify and cope with triggers and cravings. Evidence-based treatment and holistic treatment options can also improve your ability to change negative thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.

Treatment programs vary in length, as most inpatient programs last for 28 days while outpatient programs may last for several months.

Heroin Addiction Treatment Options

If you are wondering what the heroin addiction recovery statistics are, chances are you or a loved one is struggling with heroin addiction. You do not need to battle addiction alone. Northern Illinois Recover is here to help you through every step of the way. It is never too early, or too late, to reach out for help. Contact us today at 855.786.1978 to discuss your treatment options and to learn more about our programs.

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